SOUND & VISION: DUB ECHOES FILM SCREENING

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October 23, 2012 by joesonotheque

Maria’s Package Goods & Community Bar presents
SOUND & VISION – A monthly showcase of rare music videos
DUB ECHOES screening: Sunday, October 28 – 8PM – Free, No Cover
Featuring rare Dub & Reggae soundclash featuring specialists DJ Rik Shaw
Curated by Maria’s music director Joe Bryl
960 W. 31st Street, Chicago, Il. 60608 – 773.890.0588 – http://www.community-bar.com

On Sunday, October 28, Maria’s Packaged Goods & Community Bar (960 W. 31st) is continuing its special monthly showcase of rare videos and music titled SOUND & VISION. Curated by Maria’s musical director Joe Bryl (of Sonotheque fame), SOUND & VISION will feature rare musical DVDs from around the world followed by a thematically related DJ set by one of Chicago’s premier sound specialists and historians.

For our October 28 event we will screening the DUB ECHOES documentary (2009) at 8PM followed by a Reggae/Dub soundclash featuring deejay supreme Rik Shaw. Dub Echoes’ is a newly produced film about Dub, featuring an incredible array of artists, both original Jamaican artists – U Roy, King Jammy, Lee Perry, Sly Dunbar, Bunny Lee (to name a few), alongside a similarly awe-inspiring array of artists who have been taken Dub into new directions in electronic dance music – Kode9, Roots Manuva, Howie B, Adrian Sherwood and many more. Directed by Bruno Natal over a three year period, this is a killer film to be watched over and over again! Covering Dub in all its different guises.

In a review in The Guardian/The Observor  Steve Yates states:

It’s just a small word from a smaller island, but the ripples created by Jamaica’s revolutionary experiments in sound are still being felt some 40 years later. This documentary flag-waves the influence of dub to such a degree you may be left wondering if there’s any corner of the music world untouched by King Tubby’s baby, and just what role it had in the invention of sliced bread. Except, of course, it’s all true, minus the Sunblest. Hip-hop latched onto its re-adaptation of recorded sound, disco ripped it off for effects and remixology, techno minimalists hailed its kindred postmodernist spirit and sense of space, crusties skinned up and nodded off.

But for all Dub Echoes’ testimony from the music’s extended family – Brazilian rappers, London jungle and dubstep producers, Belgian mash-up auteurs – it’s reggae’s children who really nail the subject, and its malleability. UK dub producer Mad Professor explains “every object has its shadow, dub is the shadow of the tune”; stentorian Jamaican poet Mutabaruka says “it’s where the engineer becomes the artist”.

The prospect of one man and his mixing desk may not sound like an enticing spectacle (though anyone who’s witnessed live mixes in action could swear to the contrary). And it’s perhaps this fear that is Dub Echoes’ chief weakness – it’s long on talking heads, short on twiddling fingers, just a few too-brief clips of “artist” in action, hindered by slow-motion film and one-camera takes. But the delight is in the detail: Bunny Lee offering a guided tour of his old master tapes, U-Roy reminiscing about all-night open-air dances, Lee Perry explaining just why he had to burn down his old Black Ark studio. Otherwise, it’s a reminder that while Jamaica didn’t wholly create the modern music world, its role in shaping it goes on, and on, and on.

Following the screening, dancehall master deejay supreme Rik Shaw will dig deep into his crates of rare Reggae 45s and Dub plates. Since the mid 20th century, Reggae has reigned supreme in Jamaica and has influenced a wide range of artists in the fields of rock, hip hop, electronica, dance and experimental music. Deejay Rik Shaw has been one of Chicago’s main preachers in exposing both Reggae, Dub and Dancehall to the chilly confines of Chicago. Previously, Rik was part of the infamous Deadly Dragon Sound System deejay crew and has run numerous residencies around town. He shares the first Monday of the month residency at Maria’s with DJ Le Deuce titled “Future Past Music” where they provide an auditory journey into obscure and sought
after New Wave.

There is no cover for the event.

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